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cash. here in the low-interest rate environment, debt financing is going to be big. >> and the large cap plays. go through those. >> verifone, a leader in electronic payment devices. this has been disrupted by new players like square and paypal and google. the stock has been hit, but our fund manager we talked to think it's been unfairly hit. any time an industry is being disrupted, that's a good opportunity. >> u.s. bancorp? >> this is an old fashioned bank. focuses on deposits and loans and wealth management. none of the other stuff that can get you into trouble. this is one our clients really liked. >> this year dividend plays have been huge. everyone is looking for income. they look to these companies that have a good yield. the two that came through here were ford and, as it happens, our majority owner comcast. >> yes. so ford, you know, the auto recovery story is pretty significant. it's still happening. cars on the road are older. the replacement rate is going to go up. with ford, it has a rock-solid balance sheet. its dividend yield, we think, could go up. comcast is interest
they are and will they be able to perform regardless of the macro environment? >> all right. we are focused on. companies that can grow regardless of what happens in the economy. three stocks we like, one is denbury resources. what's interesting about them is they have hedged their forward sales of oil so the lowest they're going to receive is $80 next year. at those rates, they're going to be a very profitable company. it's a very inexpensive stock. we like that. it's a u.s. oil producer as well. we like that. link linkedin, we think attracted as much attention as it should. they're executing very well in the professional business social networking sense. in particular, head hunters across the globe. this is now the method of head hunting. finally, an enterprise software design company used in making semiconductor chips. we see them as providing a very stable and growing play on technology without necessarily having to pick, you know, end winners. >> got it. >> thank you. >> very good, guys. thank you all for joining us today. rick, good luck with the reappraisal on your property there, whatever you're
you're confusing your culinary fantasies with the stock selection. it's a 10% grower. the environment has gotten so promotional and you can't really say that the management team is great. true, thompson's been there for 22 years. new ceo, but skinner's gone. and by the way, so many ceos left on top -- they've left while they're on top because the there's no gas in the tank. that's a trade if it happens. you'll see some short covering. bottom line, too slow, too promotional. i'd put money elsewhere. >> the stock hasn't done well. >> had a phenomenal 2011. slowdown in 2012. when you look at the environment you can fully understand it. i love the skpaks. >> take a look at yum!. yum!'s u.s. sales has grown. the dollar menu is back. don't confuse higher sales against some very, very reports and we've got a low bar with profitability. it won't be there. >> profitability comes from breakfast. they're killing them in china. >> i'm going to look at the valuation for me growing too slow. >> it will be over 100 bucks six months from now. >> if the market's up. >> you guys have made compelling ca
for awhile. and i think for a reason. people are scared, they're worried about the regulatory environment, which doesn't look like it's going to improve dramatically. but i think it all comes down to valuation. and you've got stocks trading well below tangible book values. when you look at the diversified financials you have people that will burn in 2008 and aren't coming back to the party, but if anything, that's what gives long-term investors opportunity. >> you worried at all that some of these stocks have had such tremendous gains, i mean, i'll throw out bank of america for one, up like 80% this year? >> yeah, you've got -- you do have stocks, and that's why you have to be, i think, a little particular within the space. if you look at it across the board you still have -- i focus on the big ones trading below tangible book, where they have assets that they can dispose of, and i think they will dispose of, and you've got a couple companies that are cleaning up their balance sheets, and as we move forward, this area really does benefit from a stabilization, and hopefully an increase in
by the american people and your businesses and the economic environment worldwide. we should not accept going through that. you know, john engler, he and i philosophically do not agree on much -- [ laughter ] >> you know, i am just being honest about john. he ii a great politician. he comes from the other party. he is exactly right when he says the only thing that the debt ceiling is good for is destroying your credit rating. i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggest that they will type negotiations to that feeling both and take us to the brink of default onne again, as part of a budget to go she asian, which, by the way, we have never done in our history, until we did it last year, i will not play that game. with that, let me just say, we have one path where we resolve this fairly quickly. we have some tough spending cuts. we have modest revenue increases. you get business certainty. you do what you do best. and, we then have an open running world next year to deal with a whole host of other issues like in
look at jobs report tomorrow, is dismal. we're liking inflationary environment down the road. this is bad news. >> you could could make the argument invite blowing past short term helpful, long term payne full. melissa: spending cuts, tax hikes are very dramatic going over the cliff. when you look at numbers, still is like five to one raising taxes to cutting spending. >> that's right. melissa: no one is really talking about cutting spending. isn't that the first thing you would do? if your fiscal house was in such disarray, household at home, first thing you do is stop spending. no one is doing that. >> what scares me, is that point. whether you agree or disagree hiking taxes i am not a fan of it but i think it will come. we can get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans realize you lost election you didn't suddenly lose your backbone. this should be precursor gett
clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's vanced technology, call or visit for a risk--free 30--day trialffer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. >> breaking news from the white house, here is administration's response to the jobs market. alan krueger, chairman of economic advisors says, look, today's report provides further evidence today's economy is going to heal and here is part of the white house response. it's critical that we continue the policies that are building an economy that works for the middle class as we dig our way out of the deep hole caused by the severe recession. okay, keep going. we want these policies, that's from the white house. tax increases coming next
. they will go on record as risking a click event. they will say we did our part. no one wins in an environment where you could potentially hurl into a recession. the sense that i got from these guys is they will probably gather something. they really have too have at least the outline of a deal by friday or this weekend. i know that sounds bizarre, but they have three days to mark up a bill. three days to put it in conference. another three days to review. i am including the weekend days as they go forward here. they could change that. one would say, well, you know, we can change these rules and they can. it is either friday or potentially bust. it is a head scratch or to me that they do not see the market implications of getting something done. i know we do not have a lot of time. i think that what they will do is rush a bad deal that will be worse than no deal. i think the markets will punish them all the more. be careful. we remember when the markets fell almost 780 points. congress rushed back in action to prove another deal. a few months later the dow was down an additional amount. do not
and the environment. europe, japan and russia are also expected to continue to decline. connell: a matter of time, as they say. this fox business exclusive, we will talk about the war on business. it was a record year for anti-trust funds. dagen: the sanctions against iran. if this policy will change anything over there. the state of the economy and why it matters to you and this, the cost of crude oil. take a look at it. more than $86 a barrel. stubbornly high. ♪ >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life side down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you % today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they caopen bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. that's why you need lifelock to relentlessly protect what matters most... [beeping...] helping stop crooks before your identity is attacked. and now you can have t most corehensive identity theft protection available today... lifelock ultimate. so for protection you just can't
to allocate capital then in that environment. i know george young is with us again, joining the conversation. i want to ask you the same question. go ahead, scott. how are you investing right now? >> maria, i think the best way forward is the way it's worked since the bottom of the market in 2009. risk assets are where it's at. the fed is very supportive. the consumer is back and engaged. housing is getting better. the fiscal cliff is actually constructive from the standpoint it causes people to come together and compromise because going over the cliff while we may do it for a short time period is not beneficial to anybody. it hurts everybody. >> so risk assets being, what, technology? what does that mean, technology? >> not necessarily. we would stay with dividend payers. we would also dip our toe into europe into some very high-quality, multicountry stocks there. mostly on consumer discretionary stocks as well. >> george, we haven't forgotten you yet. scott, i have a question for you. just noticed today france and germany's stock markets hit 52-week highs. we're still wringing our hands ov
is an extension of the rather slow-growth environment had a we've seen that will help propel equity prices higher but not dramatically over the next year or two. >> bob pisani likened the fiscal cliff to y2k, and it is to a certain degree, at least in terms of decision and hiring and that kind of thing, it's creating some kind of paralysis. you talked to the traders here on the floor of the stock exchange. is it creating paralysis for them as well? they are not making any big bets until they know what happened. >> y2k created a lot of talk but didn't have impact on the stock market. i was here for that. the fiscal cliff has more impact, and it did today. i watched what the markets are doing today. today when bernanke was on, i saw interest rates move up, bond yields move up, highs for the day, and i saw stocks move down. that's kind of the opposite of what bernanke was wanting to have happen. >> right. >> and two things, guys, that did that. number one, he was questioned persistently about the fiscal cliff and had to come out and say what he said before we don't have the tools to deal with it if
is coming tomorrow -- >> they both have white beards beards. >> that environment in essence, why be in cash? why be in treasuries? they're forcing you to go out and acquire risk -- whether you believe it's artificial or not. i think there is credibility in the belief that the lot of it is artificial stimulation. >> doesn't matter. >> it doesn't matter. >> market's going up. you want to be a part of it. >> the market, you are being forced into risk assets. it looks like europe is improving. looks like i merging markets are improving. there's other places for the flows of capital to go. not just the u.s. >> i think boehner sounded like today he was overplaying his hand a little bit. if you step back from the rhetoric, the back and forth posturing in washington, i think you have a market that if you look back in october, the s&p was trading 1470. it pulled all the way back after the election. now we took right out the 1425 level which was major support on the way down. we cut right through it this morning. the s&p is trading up over 1430 right now. i don't see anything between this 1430 level
hitters here today, talking the fiscal cliff and that low interest rate environment. and actually this morning, the ceo of goldman sachs actually just went ahead and called it a bond bubble. too many companies borrowing too long-term and those cheap rates. very interesting comment. and this afternoon, some private eck by can i titans piggy backed that, talking about what the costs mean for the u.s. government especially when it is negotiating the fiscal cliff. >> you should really get an aggressive deal done, because it's for sure clear you're going to have an upward move in interest rates and when it does, we'll be in the same soup again. >> right now, we're spending about $250 billion more or less on interest. if we had normalized interest rates, what you normally would think at this kind of period of time, post-recession, we would be spending $600 billion a year for interest, given how much we're borrowing. we're not spending that much because interest rates are so low. >> so, rubenstein saying we'll incur those prices at a later date, but another said it will pay to trade agai
the creation of jobs in the u.s. economy. if you can get the u.s. economy past this model through environment, you will see a slight acceleration in the second half. cheryl: your last point is manufacturing. in the report, it was basically flat. we had downward revision for september and october from the report. you are not concerned about that sector at all? >> i am not concerned about that sector. we are looking at a longer-term and the impact it has on the u.s. economy. when you look at what the u.s. does in a manufacturing basis, we manufacture 18.2% of other manufactured goods in the world today. that is bigger than japan. that is bigger than china. it is a very significant number. we do it better and less expensively. cheryl: a report saying it would be a good thing for this country if we begin to export natural gas. it would be good for the u.s. economy. some, especially in washington, saying it would be a bad thing. it would be a job killer. >> it is hard to me to figure that out. i think we have to find a balance between exports and the cheap fuel in the united states which will caus
for taxpayers and taxes paid. so that we can create an environment for businesses to create jobs. gerri: long-term talks about this. a long way to go. i wish would come he would come back and maybe we will have a conversation. i really appreciate your coming on the show, thank you so much and i think you for having me. gerri: now we want to know what you think. banda, vote on the right-hand side of the screen. we have lots more in the show. twenty-six days until we fall off the fiscal cliff. is that what democrats want us to do? pictures seem so. we go live to capitol hill in 10 minutes. while congress talked about wanting to cut excess spending, the numbers may tell a different story. i will break it down coming up next. ally bank. why they have a raise your rate cd tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in econocs, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise ur rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. gerri: where would we be
clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatom (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (ttimonial section) did you know, 94% of people o use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aido all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric'sadva, call or visit for a risk--free 30--d trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. >> thursday morning, there's one number out every morning at 8:30 eastern, unemployment claims, 370,000, that's a very high number. historically speaking. the big employment number tomorrow morning 8:30 eastern. to the big board, we are down 8 points in the very early going. the whole question though is where is apple going to open up this morning? well, we're 15 seconds into the trading day and apple has dropped another $11 a share. and we're down 6% yesterday and down 2% and now, 527. that's the quote on apple as we open trading this morning. darden rest
at starbucks. people are desperate to find something new to buy. >> and in an environment of rising employment, that's a big deal for mcdonald's especially in the breakfast business which is a high margin business. it is highly leveraged to macro indicators too. >> when i go there, there's a promotion going on that didn't bring me into the store. i want to be brought into a store because of a promotion and not discover, wow, i paid much less than i thought. >> i told you about mcbites. will you go into the store now? >> i think they are called mccorn balls now. we changed the name. >> melissa is up to date on the menu. >> yesterday it was mcrib. >> these are very important to the stories of these fast food chains. that's why i'm so -- >> what's the calorie count? when you see the calorie count that's the determinant. can i have three lipitor. >> that's what i'm on right now. >> are you really? where is your bad cholesterol? >> it's not good. not good. >> mine is 80. >> goody for you. that's what happens when you get old. you compare cholesterol levels. >> i went to trader joe's last night. tur
as their environment, or industrial transportation, heating ventilation. so you've got a security company and what we consider to be the core of this, in many ways. significant buyback of shares, and pay dividends. but they're not moving it up, they're paying it in march. >> a new ceo comes in, listed the pelts. why should you buy anything with the pelts involved. this is work for "mad money," after pelts provided it. after. you're up 11%. in other words, you don't know before it. versus the s&p being up 4%. this goes back to 2005. he's been just a terrific guy to invest with, as, by the way, everybody tells me he's a terrific guy. >> he is a nice guy. his activism, he sort of moved it to the performance side of things, and the operational side. it was started many ways by hines, which was a nasty fight, now he's on the board. he and johnson are buddy buddy. >> johnson told me he felt pelts' idea after initial resistance, that pelts said his ideas were great. >> best buy, one of the big losers this morning. you point out merrill has a note telling a lot of people what they probably already know, fina
it will be the disconnect between economics and markets we continue to be in an environment where people don't have a great many opses. that's why these options that look so threatening action they reverse so quickly. as long as that continues to be the case. they're going to -- >> it's very simple. last night it came out that. >> i'm going to make it simple here, not for the viewers. they came out and ticked four tea party members. that took them -- some republicans are willing to adopt a much more done scilla torrie approach. that's what's driving the market. it's going to continue to drive the market. >> you're saying this is cliff driven? >> absolutely. ivities market wasn't doing all that much. the president made some comments today in front of the business roundtable. all of a sudden, we start to do explode to the up side a bit. guys, i know the music is playing, but there's a look at hewlett-packard. up 4%, pete. >> absolutely. >> there are areas you talk about, last thing is technical, look at the xlf. >>> up next, the probability that lawmakers will defy if the odds, and hammer out a fiscal cliff.
minutes but steve, if i could start with you, talk to us about the entrepreneurial environment right now in america. we hear two things. one, we hear that when the economy is not doing all that well, it's the best time ever to try and start something new. and then on the other hand, we hear that a lot of what's going on in america is keeping entrepreneurs from starting those new ventures. >> well, some of that is true. start-ups are down in the last five years. about 23%. but it is worth remembering that we started as a start-up. this company was a start-up in the last couple years, the reason we're the leading economy is because of the entrepreneurs building start-ups that have really powered our economy. we really need to as a nation double down on entrepreneurship. some of that is what needs to happen in washington, the jobs act that passed six months ago, the broad bipartisan support dealt with crowd funding and on-ramp for ipos. start-up app 2.0 introduces with bipartisan support. there's a role for washington but there's also a role for the private sector particularly entrepreneurs
through an environment with incredibly low interest rates, the financial sector is not making the money they once were. they need to be able to adapt and make some cuts. eventually at some point in time there will be a light at the end of the tunnel but right now is just management potentially cutting back to make sure they have got realistic numbers relative to what is going on today and tomorrow with regard to the economy. liz: only adds more fear to the market, the retail trader, the investor has been sitting on the sidelines. you know that as well as i do. e di ameritrade down, the stock down 20% since september of 2009. there was so much fear their and trading volumes of not gotten back to the heyday. what would get the retail investor off of the sidelines? >> number one, clarity. you talk about that an awful lot depended on the market place. once we get some sort of resolution in terms of what is going on with the tax structure and to tighten cuts and incremental revenues, what is happening with the whole fiscal cliff mantra? once they have an understanding of what is going on and
-term investor, at some point, you may look at the macro environment and say it's time to reduce some positions, at what point do you reach that tipping point? >> that's a great point. i'd be very sproized if two months resulted in an unemployment increase from 8% to 10%. i find that hard to reconcile. if we go over the fiscal cliff and there's no deal for the course of the year, we will absolutely be in another recession, no question about that. but going over the cliff for a month, it will hurt confidence, it will keep businesses on the sidelines, investors on the sidelines. it will hurt the economy. it's not a good thing, don't get me wrong. but going from 8% to 11% for one or two months fiscal cliff, that sounds extreme. i think if there's absolute gridlock in washington -- and right now washington seems to be on another planet. all of us in the markets, people at home, people in the country want republicans and democrats to work together. everyone seems to want that except for republicans and democrats. if they really are as far apart as they seem at times, we could shoot ourselves in the
't think it's isolated to the two fund managers. the point is if you're in a low return environment, you can ratchet up performance in a higher quartile, the other thing is it's not just hedge funds. they're the whipping boy. it's long only funds, they want to get that morningstar fifth star. on the other side of it, i used to know a guy when he ran a hedge fund he would sell into the markup and buy it back the next day which is great if you're not a taxable fund because he knew it was a hark wrup so this story is as old as lincoln getting shot at ford theater. i don't think there's anything here, it's very difficult to prove. >> of all of the street's top strategists, tom lee could nail the number on where the s&p will close out 2012. his prediction of 14,030 is looking better by the day. tom welcome, good to see you again. >> thanks. >> how does that factor in? i don't know if you heard geithner on our air yesterday with steve liesman but sounded like a guy prepared to go cliff diving. >> i did hear that and you know, that's not very constructive talk because at the end of the day, you
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
are smith travel, if you look at those numbers, it's a very positive environment. the fiscal cliff will affect people when employment gets affected. this is a real issue. if you see something occurring with employment, we're sensitive, we're monitoring, we represent the folks that are going to be most affected if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet w
not a cause for celebration. still a difficult operating environment. under the former chancellor's plan, we would have been borrowing less in the next three years. because the government has failed to get our economy growing and because the policies have pushed us into recent double dip recession, they'll be pr rowing 212 billion pounds more than they planned. put that in context, that is the equivalent of what we in the uk will be spending this financial year on health, transport and defense in aggregate. >> you were talking quite rightly about the low level of he have credit growth in the uk, which has obviously been a feature of this period. but there's a question of what's cause and what's effect there. the banks will tell you that that problem is not so much availability of credit, there's credit demand and even in the mortgage sector which under normal circumstances you might have been eager to see people borrow money. we're seeing net repayments for the first time for a very, very long time. so you can take the economy to water, but you can't make it drink. how do you respond. >> i s
universities, one a competition for grant money from the u.s. environment protection agency. each student group will be awarded $15,000. san jose state's project involves researching sustainable inexpensive building components. stanford's group wants to develop a low-cost colorrennation device to -- chlorination drinking device. groups will go to washington, d.c. to present their findings and the winner of that competition gets a second grant up to $90,000. >>> local democrats are asking the president to create a new no-drilling ocean preserve in california. the proposed executive order would ban offshore drilling in a 50-mile-long area from sonoma to mend see know county. the "-- men so dino -- mendocino county. lawmakers, including senator barbara boxer, and lin wasly, are spear heading the drive -- lin wasly, are -- lynn woosley, are spearheading the program. >>> there's higher rates from the p.u.c. the city says customers will pay between $11 and $95 more than the previous hike. customers will be able to opt out and have pg&e supply their power again? the operators of the oldest repsyche --
to listen yet, so we've just got to wait. that's obviously not a great environment to move things along. the optimists on both sides think we're going to get a deal, not by christmas, but by new year's. if you ask people, what's the next step? what gets things moving? it's still complicated, and nobody has a consensus on that. the biggest challenge is how you strike a deal this year that has some things left undone for next year. and there's all sorts of people thinking about different kinds of triggers, different kind of things that say, well, if congress doesn't do x, then y kicks in, but there's no agreement on what those need to be. there's going to be more revenue, but things like entitlement reform, tax reform, those things are still very unsettled. >> so senator tom coburn yesterday on "morning joe" became the latest to break rank, saying he could support president obama's tax proposal. coburn joins a growing chorus of republicans from outside the house of representatives, urging house leadership to clear the way for a broad deal that would include tax increases on the wealthy. h
and where to spend it, as they look at the u.s., what they want to see is a stable environment to put that money to work. if we can get that capital into the u.s. that will be a stimulus program by itself. >> frits, we pending on how you look at the numbers there are peel who say these two proposals aren't that far off. if you look at the numbers on each side and maybe try to find some common ground in the middle, maybe get to $1.2 trillion, where do you go on spending cuts is the big question because that seems to be a little easier. do you think this needs to be a three to one when it comes to revenue versus revenue increase or three to one when it comes to spending cuts versus revenue increases? do you see one to one, what would make you feel good looking around the globe and looking at what -- >> i'm not a tax expert so i can't give you a precise ratio. what we need to do is see a program where, if you look at reasonable numbers, you could see that the debt-to-gdp ratio comes down over time. as we go from $16 trillion, as we cross that 100% mark, we start looking more and more lik
american corporations have done a terrific job of coping with a tough regulatory environment, a tough financial. the aftermath of this financial crisis. a lot of negative publicity. and made a lot of money. >> we want to rise above. do we not have a debt ceiling right after that? >> the debt ceiling. the interesting question whether they're going to roll -- >> here's what i think. we haven't talked about this. so i say president obama allows us to go over the cliff temporarily so that all the rates go up. then the democrats introduce a bill to lower it for 9 %, do some other stiff -- 98%, do some other stuff they want to do. then the republicans say fine but we've got to hold the debt ceiling, that's the next bargaining chip. i don't think we can use rides above for the debt ceiling because we don't want to rise above the debt ceiling. we have to come one new buttons -- >> pins, the whole thing. yeah. that is a dilemma. what a polemic -- >> constantino is cutting me off. you're going to hold that against me? all right. >> you can hear the voice in my head. >> yeah. he's mad because i
than we've seen. i think the key question is going to be is that sustainable in an environment that's very promotional and with a competitor, sam's, that is starting to pivot toward more price reinvestment. >> your skepticism echos what the journal had this morning. great business, smart model, great balance sheet management, but at $98 here, it's hard to move the stock s that your thesis? >> it is. the stock is certainly richly valued. we also think that costco is largely a membership fee model. the company increased the membership fee about a year ago. you're now seeing decelerated growth for membership fees. it was a nice part of the thesis. that's kind of in the rear view mirror. the stock looks expensive. not a lot of margin opportunity in the model. it's a good growth opportunity. a phenomenal business. really fully valued here. >> finally, colin, the special dividend took a lot of people by surprise. do you think that marks a shift in the behavior of balance sheet management at the company? >> the company is extremely underleveraged, i.e. overcapitalized. they have excess cas
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and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial secti) (testinial s section did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to afrien. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. toearn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and ochure why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do f you. lyric from phonak. life is on. stuart: the bad economy, taxes regulations they will take a bite out of bonuses for wall street workers this year. don't feel too bad, though. the aaerage bonus for wall street worker will be about $101,000. which is 16 1/2% less than last year and a 50% decline from the good old days back in 2006. >>> we love to show you cool expensive items on this program. we had diamonds last week. remember? well, today, is the second day of hanukkah. we have some very expensive menorahs. joining us now is the founder of j greenstein and company. it's an auction house that deals with jewish
in an increasingly competitive environment? >> well, we try to stay ahead of the game. we have collections. i think one of the big trademarks of our product is the quality and intensity of colors, of course, joe kohler has been tremendous for us. the whole joe market opened up the professional market. we stay true to the course. when they get opi on their nails, you know it is quality. sometimes they would pay a little bit more to get a better product. that is where the opi name comes in. connell: we talk about the tax rates going up at the end of the year, potentially, for everybody. highly likely they will go up for the wealthiest of americans. in california, the top tax rate will be close to 52%. are you comfortable paying taxes at that level? >> comfortable or not, that is the price of living in california. i think there is a responsibility that each one of us has. we have to pay our fair share. it is what it is. dagen: okay. [ laughter ] >> i do not think we should get bogged down in the present, it is more important to go along with business and make more money so we can pay the taxes. dagen:
to part time, in the environment where we're looking at 8% unemployment, this isn't about solving the economy. it's very obvious now. stuart: all politics all the time, it is redistribution, it's neo-socialism, forget what it will actually do to economic growth, no, what will it do for my political legacy? >> that's the point. it's advancing the causes of bureaucracy and dependency. so you have people who they no long very a full-time job. they have a part-time job. they need more government benefits you need a bigger bureaucracy to administer it. i'm not a big government fan. if you catch say the euro train on the continent two hours from brussels, that's pretty good, if you want government spending, here's something to show for it. there's nothing to show for it here except the department of bureaucratic compliance. charles: this was a big beef with the stimulus package. they are like -- they built a bridge that took me to stuart and it took them two years to do it. charles: hold on a second. i have to go to nicole, a bank announced they are cutting 11,000 positions? they are re
top 50. that is very interesting, as well. this is the environment. it bodes very well. another winning day here on wall street. drug stocks, bank stocks doing well. the vix, the fear index, is to the downside. let's take a look at urban outfitters. taking a look at their quarterly sales. they are looking better than expected. under their umbrella is a name brand that a lot of the teenagers know very well. they had a good block friday. urban outfitters is up over two dollars. back to you. connell: as we get close to this fiscal cliff, both sides agreeing to get serious. we have heard the house speaker will update us on the talks within that hour from house floor. we will hear what speaker banner has to say. joining us right now are to congressman. would you vote if there was an agreement? >> i think it will be a balanced plan that will increase revenues by raising the rates on upper income families, but, at the same time, agreeing to substantial cuts. connell: the reason i started by asking that question is because i am sure it is frustrating, the members of congress to not be i
. this fuel is lauded as great for the environment and a good thing. some manufacture you ares are saying guess what, it will void your warranty if you use this fuel in certain cars . what do you make of this whole thing? >> melissa, what happened this is good example where the government mandates picking winners and losers and forcing decisions on the part of consumers which could be harmful to consumers. comment by aaa coming out to say the decision to allow for e15 blend or 15% of their gasoline to be derived from biofuels, in this case ethanol, the auto manufacturers have said they will not honor their warranties if people use this fuel which is potentially harmful to their engines. the automakers researched this. melissa: it is amazing because they say i void your warranty. >> yeah. melissa: can you imagine you buy the fuel and put it among the manufacturers, chrysler, gm, toyota, especially in older vehicles and look at your manufacturers website if you're in this group, what happens with the e15 the fuel separates and ethanol in there is highly corrosive to your engine. is this new
. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just
. >> what happens to the money? >> what always happens to money. we have an environment where the interest rates are low, so if you reinvest it in a fixed income product, you won't make much return. you'll have capital losses on bonds. i'm very concerned about the low interest rate in the bond market and the long period of time we've had bond yield this is low. and in the stock market, you have to be careful because there could be a sorting out among stocks between high and low dividend stocks and how they perform when these guys go x dividend. >> why couldn't you invest in g chlt and g e or comcast and get a 3% yield there. either one would be a good place.or comcast and get a 3% y there. either one would be a good place. >> wasn't i invested in company x before, didn't i have that money in there and now they're giving it back? >> now you own a larger part of the company. >> no, because -- >> if you reinvest it and they buy more share, you own a larger piece of it. >> it should be equal. they've taken that cash out of the company. the stock price should adjust lower. >> but cash is not th
pricing environment, and low interest rates. so collectively, we think these three factors would definitely drive demand verystantially next year. it's been a terrific year for the home builders. we think we're still in the third inning, not the seventh inning. both for fundamentals and the stocks. >> is there a part of the market we'll see the most building? is it the lower end or higher end? take a look at the demographic patterns, household formations depressed since 2007. there's a notion there has to be a catch-up and new households now being formed. if you're to take that piece as going forward, you would think it would be the younger end of the spectrum out there going out there -- >> absolutely. we're comfortable with the thesis that first time home buyers are going back to the market in a very strong way. we see a number of stocks doing really well who cater to that market next year, like lennar, hulte, tull will do well and our big cause of the sandskaps will show strength. arizona, california, nevada and florida. it's going to take us out. >> the concern investors migh
the environment and activities to inspire an appreciation for words, story telling, and communication in all their forms. but while reading lots of wonderful books to our children is essential, there's much more to literacy besides books. man: shall we read it? let's read it. "when i grow up, my job will be "to go to school and to drink and eat. "i will sell money if i pay money. "if you go to the store, if you buy food. "i can play on the big swing if i pay money. "if you don't, you'll have to go to jail. it's at central park. we can eat on a picnic." all right. anything else? hendrick: we can also convey to our children how satisfying and useful the written word is throughout the entire day. we can do this by writing down children's stories at group time, taking their dictation as they paint, helping children dictate and decorate letters to each other or to their parents, or adding written materials such as signs, phone books, and menus to their pretend play. teacher: are you ready for to write down what you see? what did you see? a purple... girl: cat! a purple cat? ok. it's going to say
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